Accessible Documents & Training


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    A Note About Document Remediation

    It is much easier and quicker to add accessibility features to a Word, Excel or PowerPoint document than it is to remediate the accessibility issues after conversion to PDF.

      How to Create Accessible PDF Documents

      Accessibility Best Practices

      • Use templates for specific documents
      • Use page title, heading styles, body or normal style, etc.
      • Add meaningful alt text to images and links
      • Use captions for images, tables and equations
      • Acronyms - spell it out the first time it is used at a minimum - there is some debate on not spelling it once in each section because A sightless user may skip the section the expansion text is provided in.
      • Use standard and easy to read fonts like sans-serif fonts like Arial and Verdana
      • Use good color contrast
      • Use plain language or plain English
      • Identify table header rows - repeat header rows at top of each page
      • Avoid text boxes in Word. They stand alone on the page like they are floating over other elements and often appear at the far left margin and are ignored by screen readers, which means the information will not be presented through a screen reader.
      • Create a single image out of grouped object and add alt text (as long as the images do not need links)
      • Where an image is very complex, provide a separate descriptive document to explain the complex image. Make sure the document is accessible -whenever possible avoid complicated tables that will require complex descriptions

      Document Accessibility Training

      The following Libraries offer free access to Lynda.com if you have a local library card! Check it out at:

      Recommended Accessibility Training Courses

      • Creating Accessible Microsoft Office Documents

      If you are having problems understanding the "Creating Accessible Microsoft Office Documents" you may need to review Microsoft Word.  The links below go to various versions of Microsoft Word and include the specific paragraph units that should be reviewed.

      If you have Adobe Acrobat 11 or any previous versions take the Creating Accessible PDFs (2014) course.  If you have the latest version Acrobat DC take the Creating Accessible PDFs with Adobe Acrobat DC course.  You do not need to take both.

      • Creating Accessible PDFs (2014)
      • Creating Accessible PDFs with Adobe Acrobat DC
      • Advanced Accessible PDFs (Optional)

      Additional Document Accessibility Training Resources

      How to Create Accessible Microsoft Office Documents

      How to Create Accessible Microsoft Word Documents

        How to Create Accessible Microsoft Excel Spreadsheets

          How to Create Accessible PowerPoint Presentations